http://www.vogelwarte.ch
http://www.ala-schweiz.ch/
https://www.ficedula.ch
https://www.nosoiseaux.ch
 
fr
de
it
en
Visitor Anonymous
 
Ornitho.ch homepage
The partners
Consulting
  Sightings
    - 
The past 2 days
    - 
The past 5 days
    - 
The past 15 days
 - 
Galleries
Data and analyses
 - 
Western Marsh-harrier 2022
 - 
Eurasian Golden Oriole 2022
 - 
Common Grasshopper-warbler 2022
 - 
Icterine Warbler 2022
 - 
Melodious Warbler 2022
 - 
Swiss bird status
Information
 - 
Latest news
 - 
Species partially hidden
 - 
Code of conduct
 - 
Coordinates conversions
  Help
    - 
Symbol explanation
    - 
FAQ
    - 
Videos & instructions
  Stats
Latest news
page :
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
>
>|
item/page :
count : 452
 
Wednesday, May 18th, 2022
tipnews
Birds
Ducks families

At this time of year more and more ducks families are observed on lakes and rivers. Apart from Mallards, all kinds of wild ducks are monitored by the "monitoring of selected species" program for which the total number of brood is counted. In order to obtain an accurate synthesis at the end of the breeding season we need precise information. For these observations it is therefore important to mention specifically the number of families present and, for each family, the amount of chicks and their size has to be specified (remarks field). The following link gives indications on how to estimate the size of chicks relatively to the size of adults: Altersbestimmung bei Jungenten / Détermination de l'âge des canetons).

Thanks in advance for these precisions. They simplify the data analysis and the monitoring of rare species.

posted by Bernard Volet
 
Tuesday, May 17th, 2022
avinews
Birds
Communication of the Swiss Rarities Committee

The Swiss Rarities Committee (SRC) has published the minutes of its last meeting, held on 31 March 2022, on the SRC website (www.vogelwarte.ch/src). Among the reports accepted during that meeting are the 1st record of Bonelli's Eagle in category A, the 1st record of Greater Spotted Eagle “fulvescens", the 2nd record of Purple Gallinule in category C, the 14th record of Spectacled Warbler, the 17th-21st records of Pygmy Cormorant, the 19th record of Lesser Spotted Eagle since 1900 and the 20th record of Lesser Kestrel since 1900.

In order to facilitate its administrative work, the SRC recommends to send the rarities reports and photographic proofs as soon as possible and if possible in electronic format (preferably as PDF file) to the following address: sak@vogelwarte.ch. The form can be downloaded from the SRC website (www.vogelwarte.ch/src-downloads). In the normal case, the person who discovered the bird is responsible for the sighting documentation.

The SRC thanks you for your collaboration!

posted by Bernard Volet
 
Friday, May 13th, 2022
avinews
Birds
Looking for the Osprey

As part of the project to reintroduce the Osprey to Switzerland, Wendy Strahm (project coordinator of "Nos Oiseaux") is looking for people who are willing to participate in a coordinated search for occupied territories on one or both mornings of 29 May and 19 June. This will take place on Lakes Murten, Neuchâtel and Biel, along the Aare below Biel and along the Doubs. The search of potential feeding grounds will take place from 5:30 to 10:00 a.m., basically in teams of two people per site. Further information can be found at https://www.balbuzards.ch/volontaires. Anyone who is interested and would like to spend time helping out on one or both days can contact Wendy Strahm (wendy.strahm@gmail.com) directly.
 

posted by Bernard Volet
 
Thursday, May 12th, 2022
avinews
Birds
Bulletin of the Ornithological Information Service from the Swiss Ornithological Institute

Twice a year, the Swiss Ornithological Institute publishes the so-called “ID-Bulletin”. This report summarizes the most interesting bird sightings and developments on the Swiss Avifauna over the last months. The main information source of this report are the sightings posted on ornitho.ch. Additionally, updates of the different monitoring projects of the Swiss Ornithological Institute are presented as well as interesting ring founds. The latest issue can be found here (in French or German).

We wish you an enjoyable reading!

The ornitho.ch team

posted by Bernard Volet
 
Friday, May 6th, 2022
tipnews
Birds
Precise sightings localization

Precisely localized observations are increasingly in demand, especially during the breeding season. This precision provides essential information for protection and promotion projects.

While recording observations, it is therefore very important that it is made in the right place. Whether on ornitho.ch or on NaturaList, the tip of the red pointer on the map should always define the location of the bird/animal observed (and NOT where YOU are!). In mountainous areas, precise localizations also have the advantage that they provide automatically the right altitude, the average altitude of a square kilometer being less accurate for this purpose.

With NaturaList, all observations are recorded with pinpoint accuracy. Remember to slide the map back and forth to place the actual location of the animal beneath the tip of the red pointer. On ornitho.ch you can give a precise location in observation lists too. Simply click on the “+”sign to the left of the species name and then on the "Map" tab. Then select the correct location by clicking on the map on the corresponding place.

https://cdnfiles1.biolovision.net/www.ornitho.ch/userfiles/instructions/Abb.13deuc.jpg

Thanks in advance for your commitment

 

posted by Bernard Volet
 
Tuesday, May 3rd, 2022
technews
Observation lists on the iPhone - update NaturaList now

Dear iPhone users

Since 18.1.2022 the ornitho app NaturaList is also available for iPhones (see news from this date). Until now, an important function was missing: the recording of observation lists. With the latest update, observation lists can now be entered directly in the field. For later entry (i.e. not directly in the field), the website ornitho.ch should still be used. It is now also possible to edit observations already entered in the app before they are transmitted to ornitho.ch.

If you have any questions, please contact us as usual at support@ornitho.ch.


Have fun in the field!
Your ornitho.ch team

posted by Sämi Wechsler
 
Thursday, April 14th, 2022
tipnews
Birds
The atlas codes provide essential information!

The data collected during the nesting period are particularly important for monitoring our bird populations. The atlas codes are an integral part of this. They describe in a simple way the main breeding behaviour and tell us whether breeding is possible, probable or certain. The atlas codes therefore increase the value of the observations. They also play an important role in the selection of data for local, regional and national surveys.

When should an atlas code be used?

An atlas code is required for observations of species breeding in Switzerland during the breeding season. For these species, a special page is displayed on ornitho.ch and NaturaList after the data has been entered, according to a defined period for each species. Select the code that best corresponds to the observation (choosing the highest if several possibilities are suitable). On the observation lists, a box appears on the right when the code is requested. If necessary (especially for species A and B from atlas code 7 onwards), an atlas code can also be added outside the predefined periods (e.g. a White Stork building a nest in late March). To do this, simply choose the appropriate code from the drop-down menu at the bottom of the entry form.

We wish you interesting observations!

The ornitho.ch team

posted by Bernard Volet
 
Thursday, March 31st, 2022
tipnews
Please report your observations as accurately as possible!

Many native species are relatively immobile animals (e.g. reptiles, amphibians, small mammals). In cultivated agricultural areas, their habitats are often very restricted and localised. In order to make optimal use of the distribution data for nature conservation and scientific purposes, we would be grateful if you could send us your observations as accurately as possible and not just to the nearest kilometre. This will help us to improve the quality of the data and to use them in the interest of the native species. Thank you very much!

We would also ask you to include a photograph with your observations, if possible. People with little experience in identification sometimes find it difficult to distinguish correctly between species that are morphologically similar. If you are not sure of your identification, we will be happy to guide you, provided that photos are available.

We thank you for your cooperation and wish you many beautiful observations for the next field season!

The info fauna team

posted by Cécile Auberson
 
Friday, March 25th, 2022
tipnews
Birds
Long-tailed tit: a white head is not enough

As of 1 January 2021, the subspecies A. c. caudatus of the Long-tailed Tit is no longer considered by the Swiss rarities Committee. Since the winter of 2010/2011, this white-headed subspecies has been regularly observed in Switzerland in very small numbers between late October and mid-March. Outside this period, it is extremely rare. In addition, there are many intermediate forms between the two subspecies and the identification guides are not precise enough on this subject. Therefore, many observers are not aware that head colour alone is not sufficient to identify the subspecies 'caudatus'.

Which birds belong to the "caudatus type"?

According to the current literature, Long-tailed Tits of the subspecies caudatus should have the following characteristics:

  • Pure white head, i.e. 'snow white',
  • Clean edge between the black nape and the back of the white head,
  • No collar on the breast (nor the outline of a collar either),
  • White underparts with equally white or only light pink flanks,
  • Tertiaries white or at least largely bordered with white.

Please report only the absolutely typical individuals under caudatus!

Many Long-tailed Tits that appear to have white heads at first glance actually have dark areas on their heads or grey speckles in the region of the parotia and nape. In the field, these features are not always easy to see in these small, ever-moving birds. Therefore, when pale-headed individuals are present, always look for the other criteria described above. Ideally, you should photograph them or describe the details in the remarks. If you see a typical bird of the subspecies 'caudatus' between April and the end of October, please take a picture.

The ornitho.ch team

posted by Bernard Volet
 
Thursday, March 3rd, 2022
tipnews
Birds
Absence data is also valuable

During the breeding season, many sites are visited in search of particular breeding species (e.g. nocturnal raptors, corncrakes, Rallidae or Peregrine Falcons). In most cases, we only receive data on species actually encountered. However, it is also interesting for us to know that a targeted search for a rare or difficult-to-detect species did not result in its presence during the nesting period (so-called absence data).

We would therefore be grateful if you could send us this type of information as well, by entering on ornitho.ch a number of 0 and an atlas code of 99 for the species in question (which means "Species not recorded despite active search during the nesting period"). It is also useful to give us more information in the "Comment" field (e.g. "nesting site not occupied since at least 2017"). In contrast, non-breeding season absence data should never be reported with an atlas code 99.

We naturally hope that your targeted research will be successful and thank you very much for your important cooperation.

posted by Bernard Volet
page :
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
>
>|
item/page :
count : 452
 
Biolovision Sàrl (Switzerland), 2003-2022