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Thursday, November 24th, 2022
avinews
Birds
Communication of the Swiss Rarities Committee

The Swiss Rarities Committee (SRC) has published the minutes of its last meeting, held on 9 November 2022, on the SRC website (www.vogelwarte.ch/src). Among the reports accepted during that meeting are the 2nd record of Blue-cheeked Bee-eater, the 11th record of Great Spotted Cuckoo, the 12th record of Terek Sandpiper, the 14th and 16th records of Audouin's Gull,the 17th record of Pine Bunting, the 22th record of Pygmy Cormorant and the 20th record of Lesser Spotted Eaglesince 1900.

Forms for the Swiss Rarities Committee can now be submitted directly to ornitho.ch. The online form appears automatically when a sighting needs to be documented. Please note that a detailed description of the bird and/or the voice and the circumstances of the observation are particularly important. Any complements (e.g. field sketch, photographs) are welcome. In the normal case, the person who discovered the bird is responsible for the sighting documentation.

The SRC thanks you for your collaboration and wishes you many interesting winter observations!

posted by Bernard Volet
 
Wednesday, November 23rd, 2022
avinews
Birds
European Breeding Bird Atlas as a Christmas present

We are pleased to announce that the European Breeding Bird Atlas EBBA2 is now available at the special price of 60€ (plus shipping). Where do the nearest Cranes or White-tailed Eagles breed? Where are the northernmost breeding grounds of the Black-winged Stilt? This book gives a complete overview of the current distribution of 596 European breeding bird species and their changes since the 1980s. The book also includes data from Switzerland, probably even from you!

Order your copy by 12 December to receive it before Christmas and use the discount code EBBA2EBCC.

posted by Sämi Wechsler
 
Wednesday, November 16th, 2022
tipnews
Birds
How to document a rare bird sighting?

On ornitho.ch, some sightings are marked with a yellow triangle with an exclamation mark. This means that they are out of the ordinary and must be documented. It is either a rare species, or an unusual date or location of observation.

The forms for documenting these observations can be filled in directly on ornitho.ch. They are then examined by the Swiss rarities Committee, a group of experts who consider whether the observation is sufficiently documented to be taken into account in the scientific literature.

On ornitho.ch, the online form appears automatically when a sighting needs to be documented. If you use NaturaList, you will see these observations on your ornitho.ch homepage, under the heading "My records without rarity report".

If you are lucky enough to encounter a rare bird, take the time to document your sighting. Photos and videos, even of average quality, as well as recordings (with your smartphone, the video mode is generally sufficient for this) are naturally very useful evidence, but they are not obligatory. If these documents are not available, or if they do not show the essential criteria, it is important to describe in detail what you have observed.

Use the "Description" field to do this, noting first in a few words how you found the bird and what its behaviour was. If you did not find the bird yourself but know who it is, mention this. Then describe the bird, starting with its size in comparison to the species next to it or to common species. Include all the details you observed (the bill, its length, shape and colour, the pattern of the head, back, wings, underside, tail, rump and under tail, length and colour of the legs, a sketch can also be very useful) and transcribe as much as possible of the calls or song. Also mention which of the determination criteria could not be seen. If the species is similar to one or more other species, make the differential diagnosis: note why it is the rare species and not the other similar species.

In the "Identification" section, mention in the "Experience with species" box whether you have seen this rare bird before (if so, where and how many times?) or if it is the first time.

As a general rule, the responsibility for documenting an unusual sighting lies with the person who discovered the bird. If the bird is staying, it is also important to document the last date of observation. Similarly, it is necessary to document additional individuals if the number varies, as well as sightings of the bird at a new location.

Thanking you for your cooperation, we wish you many pleasant surprises in the coming months!

posted by Bernard Volet
 
Thursday, November 10th, 2022
tipnews
Birds
Observation of ringed birds

When you manage to decipher colour rings, collars, nasal or wing marks of birds, it is possible to transmit them directly to the Ringing Centre from ornitho.ch. Simply tick the box "The bird is marked ..." at the bottom of the form for entering observations. Details are then requested on the nature of the mark and the inscriptions that appear on it. An automatic message from ring@vogelwarte.ch confirms receipt of the observation by e-mail. The information is processed by the Ringing Centre, which then informs the observers of the bird's origin. However, this can take several months in some cases, depending on the efficiency of the project coordinators involved.

Rings of breeding birds or homing pigeons, as well as incomplete or erroneous decipherments are not processed.

We are very interested in long-staying individuals and would be grateful if you could report ring readings of e.g. wintering individuals as systematically as possible.

We thank you for your collaboration and wish you excellent observations.

posted by Bernard Volet
 
Thursday, November 3rd, 2022
avinews
InfoSpecies 2023 online course programme

Discover the wide range of courses offered by InfoSpecies, the Swiss species information centre, of which the Swiss Ornithological Insitute is also a part. It contains offers on species knowledge, habitats, species conservation, data collection tools & apps - from initiation to specialisation. Would you like to be informed by e-mail about new courses? Subscribe to the InfoSpecies News.

posted by Bernard Volet
 
Friday, October 28th, 2022
avinews
Birds
Bulletin of the Ornithological Information Service from the Swiss Ornithological Institute

Twice a year, the Swiss Ornithological Institute publishes the so-called “ID-Bulletin”. This report summarizes the most interesting bird sightings and developments on the Swiss Avifauna over the last months. The main information source of this report are the sightings posted on ornitho.ch. Additionally, updates of the different monitoring projects of the Swiss Ornithological Institute are presented as well as interesting ring founds. The latest issue can be found here (in French or German).

We wish you an enjoyable reading!

The ornitho.ch team

posted by Bernard Volet
 
Thursday, October 27th, 2022
avinews
Birds

The southern shore of Lake Neuchâtel is the centre point of numerous biological monitoring programmes that guide the marsh maintenance measures carried out by the Association de la Grande Cariçaie. Michel Antoniazza (1952-2021) has dedicated his entire career to this project and was one of its main architects. Between 2017 and 2020, he set about synthesising the results from the monitoring of bird species that breed in the Grande Cariçaie – the largest lake marsh in Switzerland.

All of this knowledge, covering the years 2000 to 2020, will soon be available in a special edition of the journal of the Société romande d'étude et de protection des oiseaux Nos Oiseaux, of which Michel has been a committee member for many years. In addition to the evolution of bird populations, this work also includes original information on the behaviour of different species, resulting from the many hours Michel spent in the field. This special booklet, of approximately 200 pages, will be available upon reservation only and will be distributed next spring. It will be offered to members of Nos Oiseaux who wish to receive it and will be available at a price of CHF 20 (+ postage) to non-members. Interested parties are therefore invited, from now until the end of December 2022, to reserve the book!

posted by Bernard Volet
 
Thursday, September 29th, 2022
avinews
Yellow-browed Warbler approaching?

Will there be sightings of the rare Yellow-browed Warbler again this year? Quite possibly... Compared to last year, the autumn migration of 2022 seems to have got off to a better start at the European level. Around the North Sea, a number of sightings have been recorded again - as shown by the EuroBirdPortal, which also includes your data. If you want to be prepared, you can practise the species characteristic call in our sound gallery or at xeno-canto.org. Most detections in Switzerland occur in the first days of October, as our statistics on the species show. We wish you good luck!

Photo: A. Barras

posted by Sämi Wechsler
 
Wednesday, September 28th, 2022
technews
Synchronization problems with App NaturaList solved

We had a problem with the synchronisation/exchange of data between the app NaturaList and the website ornitho.ch in the last few days. The cause was an update from Amazon on their servers. In the meantime, the developers of ornitho.ch (Biolovision) have been able to find and solve the problem. Affected data, which in individual cases are not yet visible on ornitho.ch, will be visible on your account until the middle of next week. Please do not re-enter them.


Thank you for your patience

Your ornitho.ch team

posted by Sämi Wechsler
 
Tuesday, September 20th, 2022
technews
Google maps no longer available with next update

We would like to inform you that from the next update on NaturaList the Google maps, which are poorly suited for our purposes anyway, would no longer be available (for cost reasons). In Switzerland we recommend the use of the excellent products of SWISSTOPO, abroad those of OpenStreetMap, which are linked in the app.

Your ornitho.ch team

posted by Hans Schmid
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